The thrift store chain Savers has agreed to pay out $1.8 million to several charities and be more transparent in its business practices to settle last month’s lawsuit filed by Minnesota's Attorney General Lori Swanson, the Pioneer Press reported.

The suit alleged the company misled donors and consumers in its marketing, wrote the Pioneer Press.

The chain is a for-profit fundraising company, not a nonprofit as was assumed by many, according to the Star Tribune. It has also agreed to stop soliciting donations of used goods such as furniture, jewelry and housewares that it does not compensate charities for.

After the Attorney General went public with her findings last fall, several Minnesota charities parted ways with the company, the Star Tribune reported.

According to the Washington Times, Savers president and chief executive Ken Alterman said in a statement that he’s satisfied the company reached an agreement.

“Although we disagree with allegations advanced by the Attorney General in the past, we are satisfied that the Attorney General has resolved her differences with us,” he said. “We will return to devoting our full energy to serving the best interests of the charities and donors of this state as we have proudly done in the last 25 years.”

The thrift store chain Savers has agreed to pay out $1.8 million to several charities and be more transparent in its business practices to settle last month’s lawsuit filed by Minnesota's attorney general, the Pioneer Press reported.

The suit alleged the company misled donors and consumers in its marketing, wrote the Pioneer Press.

The chain is a for-profit fundraising company, not a nonprofit as was assumed by many, according to the Star Tribune. It has also agreed to stop soliciting donations of used goods such as furniture, jewelry and housewares that it does not compensate charities for.

After the Attorney General went public with her findings last fall, several Minnesota charities parted ways with the company, the Star Tribune reported.

According to the Washington Times, Savers president and chief executive Ken Alterman said in a statement that he’s satisfied the company reached an agreement.

“Although we disagree with allegations advanced by the Attorney General in the past, we are satisfied that the Attorney General has resolved her differences with us,” he said. “We will return to devoting our full energy to serving the best interests of the charities and donors of this state as we have proudly done in the last 25 years.”