Corrections

By
  • Justin Horwath
Oct. 09, 2007
Corrections:This article incorrectly labeled the identifiers for race in a graphic called “Minority Faculty at the U of M.” There are nearly 2000 non-Hispanic Caucasian faculty and under 500 faculty of color. In the graphic below that one, labeled “Big Ten Minority Faculty” the source incorrectly sited Office of Institutional Research. Chronicle of Higher Education is the source.
By
  • Mike Rose
Oct. 08, 2007
Corrections:This article incorrectly stated the name of the building. The name should read Education Sciences Building.
By
  • Kara Nesvig
Oct. 04, 2007
Corrections:A page 1 article “Unkempt. Urban. Ubiquitous” in Thursday’s A&E section gave detail to a rumor that has been proven to be untrue. Victoria’s Secret will be occupying the former Gap building in Calhoun Square.
By
  • Betsy Graca
Oct. 04, 2007
Corrections:This article incorrectly referred to Ramadan as a Muslim holiday. Ramadan is an Islamic tradition, not a holiday.
By
  • Andy Steinke
Sep. 27, 2007
Corrections:

This article incorrectly stated the age of a partygoer due to an error in the police report. The boy listed as 9 was actually 19.

Also, this article incorrectly stated that two men were arrested for throwing a construction barrel off the 10th Avenue bridge. They were merely cited.

By
  • Alyssa Kroeten
Sep. 27, 2007
Corrections:This article incorrectly quoted Kerry Danahy. The correct quotation is “a good faith effort.”
By
  • Kara Nesvig
Sep. 20, 2007
Corrections:This article incorrectly identified a musician in a photograph. The musician is Breanne Durenberger.
By
  • Alyssa Kroeten
Sep. 18, 2007
Corrections:The article titled, “Obama backs striking workers,” has a subhead that is misleading and factually incorrect. The subhead reads, “Obama canceled his scheduled visit to the University and moved to an off-campus site.” Obama wasn’t planning on visiting campus that weekend and this subhead makes it seem as if he had chosen to go elsewhere in the area when he in fact was never coming to the campus or the Twin Cities.
By
  • Jake Grovum
Sep. 12, 2007
Corrections:

This article was published partially incorrect, both factually and grammatically.

The errors occurred after we had completed both reporting on and writing the story. They occurred following three rounds of editing, somewhere between getting to copy desk and publication.

The suggested headline read, “Prosecutors seek harsher sentence;” however the headline ended up as “Prosecution ups charges.”

The Hennepin County Attorney’s Office filed a notice of the prosecutor’s intent to seek a harsher sentence, which was the basis of our story. Jones’ third-degree criminal sexual conduct charge remains the same as it has since his arrest July 16.

Also changed from the original story, the lede read “ … Wednesday after filing a notice seeking a harsher charges for Jones ... ” Our original sentence read “ … seeking a harsher sentence … ”

This original phrasing is true.

If officials indeed did attempt to seek a harsher charge, they would have to prove that Jones used a weapon, the alleged victim had a fear of “great bodily harm” during the act or that Jones was aided or abetted by accomplices. Typically, officials issue first- or second-degree charges in a statutory rape case, or if the alleged victim is mentally impaired.

Court files and the criminal complaint show none of the above scenarios occurred.

—Justin Horwath and Jake Grovum

By
  • Justin Horwath
Sep. 12, 2007
Corrections:

This article was published partially incorrect, both factually and grammatically.

The errors occurred after we had completed both reporting on and writing the story. They occurred following three rounds of editing, somewhere between getting to copy desk and publication.

The suggested headline read, “Prosecutors seek harsher sentence;” however the headline ended up as “Prosecution ups charges.”

The Hennepin County Attorney’s Office filed a notice of the prosecutor’s intent to seek a harsher sentence, which was the basis of our story. Jones’ third-degree criminal sexual conduct charge remains the same as it has since his arrest July 16.

Also changed from the original story, the lede read “ … Wednesday after filing a notice seeking a harsher charges for Jones ... ” Our original sentence read “ … seeking a harsher sentence … ”

This original phrasing is true.

If officials indeed did attempt to seek a harsher charge, they would have to prove that Jones used a weapon, the alleged victim had a fear of “great bodily harm” during the act or that Jones was aided or abetted by accomplices. Typically, officials issue first- or second-degree charges in a statutory rape case, or if the alleged victim is mentally impaired.

Court files and the criminal complaint show none of the above scenarios occurred.

—Justin Horwath and Jake Grovum

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