Barry Lytton

Articles

Minnesota startups ‘Rise with the Rest’

A blue bus rolled up to the Varsity Theater in Dinkytown on Tuesday, and when its doors opened, a man worth $1.3 billion stepped out with $100,000 burning a hole in his pocket. Inside the venue, 10 startup hopefuls had five minutes each to pitch their businesses for a hefty investment from AOL co-founder Steve Case, who stopped by Minneapolis on his “Rise of the Rest” tour. It was Case’s second stop on his Midwestern journey to kick-start entrepreneurial ventures and pay homage to startups’ critical economic value.


Scammers target international students

A phone rings in the middle of the day. Minutes later, it buzzes alive again with a caller listed as the “University of Minnesota Police Department.” A menacing voice declares an outstanding arrest warrant. Scammers use this calling strategy to try to trick students out of their money, and the fraudulent crime has noticeably surfaced at the school, according to a public safety update emailed to the University community Wednesday.


Gender-neutral bathrooms now legal in Minneapolis

Due to a recently passed resolution, Minneapolis restaurants and bars now have the option to offer gender-neutral, single-user bathrooms as a substitute for gender-segregated restrooms. City Council members unanimously passed the resolution at a meeting Friday. The change, City Council members said, encourages gender-neutral restrooms throughout the city’s businesses, educational facilities and other buildings, in part to better accommodate the transgender community.


Sneaker-head sanctuary

The main feature of Como Avenue Southeast’s newest storefront is designed to look like a cross between a Foot Locker and an art gallery — a fantasy of sorts for local sneaker-heads. PIFFmpls, a one-stop shop for streetwear needs, opened Labor Day, and it consigns luxury shoes and clothing from brands like Versace, A Bathing Ape, Gucci and Hugo Boss. Its self-described “curator” and owner, Ben Alberts, said though the store’s stock is now split evenly between shoes and apparel, Alberts is looking to expand to art, prints and fixed-gear bicycles.


Sneaker-head sanctuary

The main feature of Como Avenue Southeast’s newest storefront is designed to look like a cross between a Foot Locker and an art gallery — a fantasy of sorts for local sneaker-heads. PIFFmpls, a one-stop shop for streetwear needs, opened Labor Day, and it consigns luxury shoes and clothing from brands like Versace, A Bathing Ape, Gucci and Hugo Boss. Its self-described “curator” and owner, Ben Alberts, said though the store’s stock is now split evenly between shoes and apparel, Alberts is looking to expand to art, prints and fixed-gear bicycles.


Old fans, new noise

NFL fans took over University of Minnesota neighborhoods Sunday, upping usual weekend commotion at Dinkytown and Stadium Village bars, as the Minnesota Vikings made TCF Bank Stadium its long-term crash pad. The Vikings didn’t fare well in their hometown outing against the New England Patriots on Sunday, losing 30-7. But the loss didn’t stop a good share of NFL football fans from making their way to University of Minnesota neighborhood bars and businesses throughout the day.


Fourth Street squeezed for parking, biker lane

Down Fourth Street Southeast, past the McDonald’s arches that mark the road’s intersection with 15th Avenue Southeast, a bicycle lane disappears. The three-lane, one-way road has a bike lane starting near TCF Bank Stadium. But once it hits 15th Avenue Southeast, a bike lane gap lasts until 13th Avenue Southeast, spanning the heart of Dinkytown.


Tracking the orange cones: your map for campus construction

The city of Minneapolis is known for its winters, long seasons blanketed by somber streets and bitter cold. But after the snow melts, summer’s sawdust collects and streets roar alive with the buzz of jackhammering and the melodic beep of backing trucks. This summer was no exception. At least 19 major construction projects — ranging from building renovations to street reconstruction — are underway in the University of Minnesota area.


As students move out, local program helps salvage items

In the weeks leading up to the fall semester, the flux of students moving in and out of University of Minnesota housing and campus-area neighborhoods yields its casualties. Mangled mattresses, broken bookshelves and shattered mirrors litter the streets. But some of those items will be saved by Pack & Give Back, a program coordinated between the city of Minneapolis, the University and a bevy of neighborhood associations. In its second year of operation, the program is extending its reach into the campus area to clear out waste and collect any salvageable items.