Emily Eveland

Articles

The Meat Puppets minus gristle

After 34 years in the psychedelic southern rock game, the Meat Puppets are still going strong. It hasn’t been easy. The band –– currently comprised of brothers Curt and Cris Kirkwood and drummer Shandon Sahm –– has dissolved twice in the past three decades, primarily due to Cris’s struggles with heroin and crack cocaine.


Album review: Johnny Cash’s “Out Among the Stars”

In the early 1980s, Johnny Cash relapsed. In 1983, he cleaned up in rehab. The next year, he wrote and recorded the majority of “Out Among the Stars,” an album that was never released — until now. Cash’s son, John Carter Cash, dug up the old recordings, recruited guitarist Marty Stuart to record new tracks and released what may be the most cringe-worthy Johnny Cash album to date. It’s not Cash’s fault. Columbia Records shelved the album after its recording. And it’s understandable that his son would want to release the lost tapes.


Q&A with California-based jam band, Slightly Stoopid

When they were 16 years old, Slightly Stoopid’s Miles Doughty and Kyle McDonald were discovered by Bradley Nowell, (the now-deceased frontman of Sublime) in their hometown of Ocean Beach, Calif. Nowell invited them to play at a “cowboy punk bar,” liked what he heard and asked them to record an album for his label, Skunk Records. The rest was history.


Faring well on the stage after a rocky road

After four years of failed attempts at getting into the Minnesota Fringe Festival, Jena Young finally got a spot in last year’s 11-day event. The only problem was that she wasn’t notified until two weeks before she was set to perform. In that short time, Young wrote a one-woman show about being on welfare in her early 20s, aptly titled “Memoirs of a Welfare Queen.” The show was met with enough positive reviews for Young to rework the script and perform it again, this time at Bryant Lake Bowl’s theater in Uptown.


“There will be blood”

Nathanael England was trying to find something to set off the coyote trap. “We probably don’t have any carrots, do we?” England asked his partner, Remedy Howard. “We have one carrot. It’s organic. Organic carrots are wimpy,” Howard said, handing England the lone vegetable.


The rise of Tommy Ryman

Tommy Ryman learned the hard way that it’s sometimes best to keep successes a secret until they’re a sure thing. When A&E caught up with Ryman at Seward Cafe earlier this month, he mentioned that he was once flown to Orlando to film a bit for “NickMom Night Out,” which was later removed due to a copyright issue. Unfortunately, he’d already told his dentist (among others) that he would be on the show.


An experiment in speed

*Names have been changed for privacy On Monday evening, I dated 13 people in two hours while my boyfriend stayed home and watched the Olympics. I wasn’t cheating on him; I was just curious — who does this? And why? Yaacov Deyo, a Rabbi and Harvard grad, invented speed dating in 1998 as a way to help young Jewish singles find their mates. His approach spread like wildfire, and knockoffs soon began popping up across the country.


The dark arts of Dan Wieken

Dan Wieken’s art starts in the first-floor hallway of the Tilsner Artists’ Cooperative in St. Paul, with drawings of a deer skull, a woman with mutilated breasts and what Wieken referred to as “a deathripper night attack grim reaper with a sword in a graveyard.” The plaque underneath his work reads: “Dan Wieken. Raised in a rural, Minnesota woods shack. With a stick, dirt, and animal hides to mark on, this is the end result of an almost feral mind.”


Farting and fronting with Frankie Teardrop

Cans of Mendota Springs sparkling lemon-flavored water were everywhere. They started in the doorway and snaked toward the overflowing garbage can, where some were piled on top of each other and more rested on the floor, forming an unintentional Mendota Springs shrine. Three cans sat on the guitar amp in the far back, and one more was in Jordan Bleau’s, aka Frankie Teardrop’s, hand.


Local leather lovers unite

Spencer Doar As Mikayla Gustafson retrieved her café miel from the coffee bar, she turned to her friend Katrina Haugen and said, “I talked to this transsexual medium named Peppermint.”