Ryan Faircloth

Articles

Legislative session ends with major goals unmet

When the legislative session ended last week, lawmakers failed to agree on an important deal to fund state infrastructure but managed to salvage some bills.   Still, legislators said there were some successful bills to take away from the session.   The Legislature passed a $182 million supplemental budget to fund many programs, including $35 million for equity programs targeting racial disparities, $25 million for E-12 education and $35 million for broadband internet 


Dayton backs revised police body cam bill

Despite some public clamor, the State Legislature passed a revised police body camera bill last week. Gov. Mark Dayton signed the bill into law Tuesday morning. Much of the criticism of the bill comes from its language, which some say favors law enforcement agencies. Others, however, believe the bill will help transparency.


Minneapolis approves paid sick-leave

The Minneapolis City Council voted unanimously approved an ordinance that will provide paid sick and safe time for most Minneapolis workers. The vote at Friday’s council meeting drew cheers and a standing ovation from supporters at the meeting. The ordinance has been opposed by some business owners who say the requirement will hurt business in the city.


Legislature fails to pass bonding bill before Sunday adjournment

  The University of Minnesota will receive no state funding after the state Legislature failed to pass a roughly $1 billion bonding bill in the waning hours of the legislative session Sunday night. The University had requested about $236 million from the state to help pay for infrastructure projects and building repairs. Gov. Mark Dayton originally recommended a $153.3 million distribution to the University.


Hodges addresses racial inequality

In her third State of the City address, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges praised the city’s progress but acknowledged lingering problems of racial disparities. Although she commented on the city’s efforts to improve race relations, Hodges’ speech last week drew criticism from some community members. “Minneapolis is a remarkable and wonderful city, and Minneapolis is a city of deep challenges, particularly regarding race,” Hodges said.


Paid sick leave hearing draws criticism, approval

Chants of “Sick leave for who? Sick leave for all!” echoed through the hallway of Minneapolis City Hall  last week, where workers and business owners discussed a proposal on paid sick time for Minneapolis workers. The three-hour hearing attracted more than 70 Minneapolis residents who voiced their opinions on the ordinance before the final City Council  vote Friday. 


Legislature fails to pass bonding bill

The University of Minnesota will receive no state funding after the state Legislature failed to pass a roughly $1 billion bonding bill in the waning hours of the session Sunday night. The University had requested about $236 million from the state to help pay for infrastructure projects and building repairs. After a bonding bill passed through the House with minutes to spare Sunday night, it was sent to the Senate, where it was amended to include funding for a proposed Southwest light rail line from Minneapolis to Eden Prairie.


Local businesses coexist and compete

A new body waxing chain will open a location near the University of Minnesota, two blocks northeast of a 15-year-old Dinkytown salon.   The Refinery co-owner Megan Smith said she’s worried the new competition, Waxing the City, will hurt her business, but other local business owners


Drones may soon be able to operate on their own

University of Minnesota and University of Colorado-Boulder researchers, along with scientists from three other schools, are looking for ways to improve tornado warnings using drones.   Though researchers at the school are years-deep in drone research, the upcoming study — slated to start in January — will shift it


Course tests potential for 3-D printing

In awe of 3-D printing and its creative potential, Mac Cameron, a University of Minnesota physics graduate and an application engineer at Stratasys, decided he wanted to share his passion with students at the University of Minnesota. Cameron started a 3-D printing class last fall, and the course is gaining popularity among students looking for unique jobs



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