Ryan Faircloth

Articles

Disease dissolves game fish

Adisease dissolving the muscles of fish could be impacting commercial fishpond owners in the state, and University of Minnesota researchers are searching for a solution.   Scientists studying aquatic disease at the University are trying to figure out how heterosporis — a parasite that invades and liquefies fish muscles


3-D printed tube could regrow nerves

University of Minnesota researchers are working on finding a way to repair the motor and sensory functions in rats with damaged nerves by 3-D printing new ones.   Their preliminary research, published  earlier this month, could lead to the creation of custom


Researchers sequence mussel DNA

A group of University of Minnesota researchers are the first in the world to attempt to map the genome of the zebra mussel in order to try and control the species’ spread.   Scientists at the University’s Genomics Center, the Mayo Clinic and the Univer


Tags monitor common carp

A University of Minnesota professor hopes to reel in invasive species in the state by implanting fish with electronic tags.   Fisheries and wildlife professor Peter Sorensen is tracking the mo


U creates data-sharing network

An online data network could help University of Minnesota researchers share their results with collaborating scientists at the school.   The National Science Foundation granted $500,000 last month to the University to build a data-sharing network for researchers t


Bioprinting could treat cancers

A University of Minnesota pediatrics professor is printing off pieces of organs in hopes they’ll help treat cancer. Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari, who specializes in blood and marrow transplantation, has been working with a Biobots bioprinter — one of only 20 in the world — to create a piece of esophagus out of human cells.


Bioprinting could treat cancers

A University of Minnesota pediatrics professor is printing off pieces of organs in hopes they’ll help treat cancer. Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari, who specializes in blood and marrow transplantation, has been working with a Biobots bioprinter — one of only 20 in the world — to create a piece of esophagus out of human cells.



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