Ryan Faircloth

Articles

Hodges: All Minneapolis police officers will be equipped with body cameras by October

Starting Wednesday, nearly 200 Minneapolis police officers will wear body cameras daily. Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges and Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau held a press conference Tuesday to announce the update to the camera rollout. The Minneapolis Police Department’s 1st Precinct officers were first to receive the cameras on July 11. Officers in the 4th Precinct are currently undergoing body camera training, and will wear the new cameras by the end of July.


In state legislature, special session likely

After Minnesota lawmakers convened Friday morning, a special session in late August looks likely. During the two-hour meeting, Gov. Mark Dayton and legislative leaders spoke at a press conference about their special session bid. “I will say that we had a really good meeting,” said House Speaker Kurt Daudt, R-Crown.  “We have decided, I think, that it’s in the best interest of everyone if we do a special session.” Daudt said they are aiming to hold the special session during the third week of August.


Police accountability petition advances

A petition to place a police insurance amendment on November’s ballot was approved at a Minneapolis City Council committee meeting Monday. Though the measure requires another step of council approval before it’s placed on any ballot, the proposal — backed by the Committee for Professional Policing and more than 7,000 signatures — would require every Minneapolis Police Department officer to carry professional liability insurance.


Protest follows 4th Precinct shooter’s bail hearing

Protesters attended a bail hearing Wednesday, July 6, for Allen Scarsella, one of the men who shot five community members at a 4th Precinct protest following the fatal police shooting of Jamar Clark. Scarsella claimed self-defense in the shooting, which caused renewed protests at the Hennepin County Government Center.  Judges ultimately denied reduced bail because they said Scarsella poses a threat to the public. 


Bail hearing for Black Lives Matter shooter draws controversy

Protesters attended a bail hearing Wednesday for Allen Scarsella, one of the men who shot five community members at a 4th Precinct protest, following the fatal police shooting of Jamar Clark. Scarsella claimed self-defense in the shooting, which caused renewed protests at the Hennepin County Government Center. Judges ultimately denied reduced bail because they said Scarsella poses a threat to the public.


MPD aims to better respond to mental health crises

Amid calls for accountability, Minneapolis officials have decided to train police officers in handling mental health calls.  The Minneapolis City Council approved a contract Friday with the Minnesota Crisis Intervention Team Officer’s Association to train 500 Minneapolis officers in mental health crises between 2016 and 2017. The training aims to give police the know-how to help those struggling with mental illnesses so they can de-escalate situations, said MN CIT Officer’s Association Executive Director Michael Peterson.


Old tires spur health concern

When Nancy Brown registered her child for preschool at Lyndale Community School, she noticed a strong odor wafting from the school’s playground. The odor was that of rubber tires from the mulch on the playground’s infill. After researching the mulch, Brown discovered that there are health concerns associated with the recycled mulch and decided to act. She made a petition urging Minneapolis Public Schools to remove the materials, which has gained more than 2,400 signatures.


University professor awarded 100th Regents Professorship

The University of Minnesota announced the selection of its newest Regents professor on Wednesday. Christopher Uggen, professor of sociology and law, was awarded with the 100th Regents Professorship — the highest level of recognition the University gives to faculty members — for his achievements in criminology and law, adding to the list of awards and achievements he’s received. 


Democrats end House protest

A more than 24-hour sit-in by U.S. House Democrats on chamber floors ended Thursday.  The protest by Democratic legislators began around 11:30 a.m. Wednesday to demand votes on gun control measures in the wake of the recent mass shooting in Orlando, Fla.  Minnesota Reps. Keith Ellison, Rick Nolan and Betty McCollum, as well as Sens. Al Franken and Amy Klobuchar, helped hold the floor to encourage voting on gun control bills to strengthen background checks and prevent people on the government’s no-fly list from buying firearms. 


Development may threaten comedy club

Local and national comics and fans flocked to Minneapolis City Hall Monday to support Acme Comedy Company, which may close if a nearby apartment plans move forward.  The proposed development — a 124-unit complex from local developer Solhem Companies — would replace a 130-car parking lot, limiting access to parking for customers of the renowned North Loop club.  To voice their opposition to the plan, more than 20 Acme supporters testified at a public hearing at the Minneapolis City Planning Commission meeting Monday.



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