Trent M. Kays

Articles

Sexual assault on campus is everyone’s problem

I believe the narrative surrounding sexual assault on campus is based solely on maintaining schools’ reputations. Instead of protecting their students, some schools would rather sweep the issue under the rug. Moreover, some schools employ laughable disciplinary processes.


Sexual assault on campus is everyone’s problem

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights periodically releases a list of colleges and universities under investigation for violations over the handling of sexual violence claims. These investigations span the entire country’s state and private schools. This offers a problematic view of education in the United States.


Sexual assault on university campuses is everyone’s problem

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights released a list of 55 colleges and universities last Thursday that are under investigation for violations over the handling of sexual violence claims. These investigations span the entire country’s state and private schools. This offers a problematic view of education in the United States. There are numerous violations of the handling of sexual violence claims, ranging from prolific institutions like Harvard University to small, local colleges like the Butte-Glen Community College District in California.


The net neutrality war is still going, and we may be losing

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit decided Verizon v. Federal Communications Commission earlier this year, which focused on the 2010 FCC Open Internet Order that restricted broadband providers from blocking, engaging in unreasonable discrimination and being opaque with websites. The court decided in favor of Verizon, finding that the FCC didn’t have the authority to enforce an open Internet.


TEDxUMN’s passivity, lineup do a poor job of educating

I attended the TEDx event at the University of Minnesota last year. A student committee organized TEDxUMN with the goal of providing the university community with an opportunity to participate in the glory of TED. For those unfamiliar, TED is an international lecture series that runs under the banner “ideas worth spreading.”


The Internet is the source of a recent loss of religious belief

No one doubts the prevalence of and proclivity for change that the Internet induces. The Internet has dramatically and fundamentally changed the lives of billions of humans across the world. Access to new knowledge, now readily available because of the Internet, has allowed humans to consider new perspectives, ideas and paths of happiness. This includes concepts of religion.


Our country needs to support parents supporting their families

New York Mets player Daniel Murphy recently took two days of paternity leave to support his wife during childbirth. Murphy missed two games in order to witness the birth of his first child, and he said he doesn’t regret his decision at all. However, plenty of people regret Murphy’s decision, and sports radio seemed to explode in righteous indignation over his choice.


Young social media users could learn from previous generations

The concept of social media is hardly original. Often, when we discuss social media, we do so in a way that refers to contemporary variations of media, chiefly Facebook or Twitter. However, such discussions would be stilted if we didn’t consider social media to be more than simply Facebook or Twitter. As long as there has been media, there’s been social media.


What can we learn from the death of Fred Phelps?

Fred Phelps is dead, and I’m not happy. The 84-year-old former Westboro Baptist Church figurehead died of natural causes last Wednesday. I don’t know if it was peaceful or not, but the fire and brimstone pastor is no longer part of this world. It would be a challenge to find anyone in the United States who hasn’t heard of Phelps’ tactics of hate. His organization — or cult — has picketed and interrupted everything from funerals to concerts to memorials.


25 years later, the Web continues to revolutionize technology

A quarter-century ago, Sir Tim Berners-Lee presented a paper to the CERN lab in Switzerland outlining his vision of a connected world. His idea was to link documents across computers in order to improve access to information. The World Wide Web was born.